crib

Jack in crib

Jack in hand, the same suit as starter, scores one point ("His Nobs"). Does a Jack in the crib, the same suit as starter, score for "his nobs" or not? Here's why the question comes up:

In a rule book of card games it says, "His Nobs: For a Jack in hand, of the same suit as starter, score 1."

Question is, "in hand" seems to mean cards one is holding, in one's hand. If the Jack (of the same suit as starter) is in one's crib, that is not technically held in one's hand as it is not used during play, but only counted at the end of play. So, does the Jack in the crib also score as "His Nobs" (if that card is of the same suit as the starter)?

I have also searched various websites and there is no clarity on this one, particular point (which could be a point of contention, depending on who your opponent is)! Thanks.

5 card crib

fed up with boys crib !!!! when will somebody bring on the real game (5 card crib)?

gui cribbage game for linux

I found a tarball at the linuxforum.org site for a gui crib for linux at the link below. With a little help I now have a gui crib for linux finally. The poster Miven was kind enough to share his work and I remembered finding this site that gave me knowledge of the text game so thought I would share my good fortune. it is not perfect but well worth the look and I applaud his effort. it is based partly on the bsd game to my understanding. it is not a project the creator is working on but an offering of a personal project that works for him and I was thankfull for it.Perhaps someone else will try it and give thanks if it works. it is the only thing I have found so far.

http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/graphic-arts-digital-imaging/200744-cri...

Rationale for not scoring a 4-card crib flush?

I am new to the game of cribbage and am curious about the conspicuously negative rule excluding four-card crib flushes. This rule seems to be begging for a good mathematical explanation. Statistics seems like the right explanation, but the five-card crib flush is very improbable and intuitively does not seem to justify a special rule excluding the four-card flush.

Cribbage on android

For those of you that don't go for fruit based computing (mine started and ended with apricot :-) there are a few nice cribbage applications for the Android platform.

I've recently tried a couple on my Xperia X10 and so far am loving "Cribbage pro!" Which you should be able to find on the android market with no probs. Supports 3 levels of computer opponnent and multiplayer play.

Richard (richard.john.clements@gmail.com)

Cribbage rules - the scoring

(Previous section: Cribbage rules - the go)

Having played out all the cards, both players then score their hands, pone first - this time including the turn-up card as part of both hands. The dealer's crib also includes the turn-up. Again, points are scored for 15s, runs, and pairs; you can also score for a flush (all cards of the same suit) - see the cribbage scoring chart below for a handy reference. It is a key part of the rules of cribbage that the non-dealer should score first - at the end of the game, both players may have enough points to win, and the right to score first will determine victory. The cribbage board's positions usually alternate during the game, with first one player leading, then the other. The trick is to be in the first-scoring position when you are close enough to win!

Cribbage flush

If the four cards in your hand are of the same suit, you score four for a flush (a cribbage flush, unlike in poker, doesn't beat three of a kind!). If the starter card is also of the same suit, you score five. However, in the crib you cannot score a four-card flush; all five must be the same suit. These rules occasionally have local variations, so check to make sure which rules are being used. In an official tournament, the American Cribbage Congress rules apply.

Some cribbage rules sites explicitly state that flushes are not scored in cribbage. This is incorrect, at least according to the American Cribbage Congress rules, which are the nearest thing to an official set of rules for cribbage.

Cribbage pairs

2 points are scored for a pair in cribbage, and 6 for a pair royal - that is, three cards of the same rank. This can be considered as 3 different pairs worth 2 points each. Similarly, double pair royal (four of a kind) scores 12 as there are 6 ways of picking two cards from four. You begin to see why mathematicians love this game.

Combinations of cards making 15 score two points each - for example, 8 and 7. As many ways as you can make 15 with your cards, you score 2 points for each of them. For example, 8-7-7-A can make 15 three ways: the 8 and one 7, the 8 and the other 7, and the 7-7-A. Consequently it scores 6 points (for 15s, and a further 2 for the pair of 7s).

Cribbage runs

Runs score as many points as there are cards in them. For example, a four-card run 9-T-J-Q scores 4.

Cribbage nobs

You also score 1 point if you have the Jack of the same suit as the starter card (known as 'his nob' or just 'nobs').

Cribbage scoring chart

You can print out this cribbage scoring chart and keep it handy when you're playing!

Score Value Comment
15 2 -
Pair 2 -
Pair royal 6 Three of a kind
Double pair royal 12 Four of a kind
Run 1 per card Runs need not be in numerical order (eg 3-5-6-4) but they must be consecutive (3-4-4-5 does not score).
Go 1 The go is scored by the last player to lay a card.
31 2 The 2 points for 31 includes a go (by definition no-one can go when the total is 31). So no extra point is scored for the go.
Nobs 1 "One for his nob" is scored if you hold the Jack of the turn-up suit.

Continue to Cribbage rules -example hands

Cribbage rules - the discard

(Previous section: Cribbage rules - the basics)

Following the cut, each player throws away two cards from his hand into the 'crib' or 'box' - a third hand that is scored by the dealer. The rules of cribbage differ in this respect from its predecessor, Noddy (see the cribbage origins page for more details). This phase of cribbage is called the discard. Since the crib scores points for its owner, your choice of discard will generally be different depending on whether the crib is yours or your opponent's. However, you must throw two cards; it is against the rules to discard none or only one.

It is no exaggeration to say that the discard is the part of cribbage where skill and knowledge has the greatest effect on the outcome of the game. Whole books can be, and have been written, on the art of cribbage discards. A great site to practice your discards is The Daily Cribbage Hand, which has a sample hand for you to consider and then compare your choice of discard against other users, and discuss the different choices.

There are rules of thumb about the discard, and you can find some of these on the Discards section of Cribbage Corner. However, the choice of cards to throw is entirely free and not mandated by the cribbage rules.

Continue to Cribbage rules - the turn-up.

Runs in the play

Ty Nielson emailed to ask:

So, we’re having some controversy in the office over some of the rules of the cribbage game, all being long time players of cribbage and each of us having slight variations in the rules that we want to play. For the rules that I request please answer with the rules that would be played in a traditional cribbage tournament. This is very important, it’s a business full of wrestlers, knife vendors, construction workers and young people, its getting pretty rough around the company deck here if you can imagine.

  1. When in play, and three people are playing cards off of one another, and a sequence of cards is thrown (3, 5, 4) do the cards have to be in sequence? Does the above throw represent a run of three for the thrower of the 4?
  2. Now assuming that 3,5,4,2 were played…. Do the last three cards have to be in sequence or is this 4 points for the player of the 2?
  3. Once this 4 card series is played, if 3,5,4,2,3 is played is this three points because it is the last three cards which must be in sequence? Or is this a double run of 4 for 8 (not counting the pair)?
  4. Similarly if the next card played is a 4, will this count as a double double run of four? How would this be counted.
  5. What are the specific rules for adding to runs in game play?
  6. During tournament cribbage, when the dealer has 4 cards in the crib of the same suit that do not match the lead card which was cut from the deck how does the dealer count his crib? Flush or not?
  7. If you have a detailed standard set of rules

Ty, that's a lot of questions! We spoke to Ezra, Cribbage Corner's wrinkled retainer and rules librarian. His rheumy eyes peered over his horn-rimmed glasses as he said:

The most important rule to remember when counting runs in the play is this. "Each card played scores points for the run it completes."

To take your first example of 3, 5, 4, the 4 completes a run of 3 so it scores 3. It does not matter if the cards are not in sequence.

If the next player lays a 2, that completes a run of 4, so scores 4.

There are no double or triple runs in the play (those only count when scoring the hand). So if 3,5,4,2,3 is played the last card only completes a run of 4, so it scores 4.

If the next card is a 4, that completes a run of 3 (2-3-4) so scores 3.

If a pair is played, it scores points for a pair but not for a run. For example, 2-3-4-4 would score 2 points for the pair, but it does not complete any runs, so it does not score any run points. Laying a 5 on this does not complete a run, because of the two 4s preceding it, so scores nothing. Remember there are no multiple runs in the play.

Your last question about the flush is simpler to answer. Remember 'No 4-card flushes in the crib'. While you can score a 4-card flush in the hand, in the crib all 5 cards must be of the same suit to score.

While there are no truly official rules for cribbage, the American Cribbage Congress is the recognised governing body for tournament cribbage in the United States and most tournaments worldwide are played according to its rules:

ACC Tournament Rules

However, most of these relate to handling unusual situations (misdeals, mis-pegging and so on). For a detailed explanation of the mechanics of cribbage play, Pagat.com's Six Card Cribbage page is very useful.

Scoring a flush in the crib

James Walker emailed to ask:

four card flush...I know it counts fourin hand ...BUT does it score four in CRIB ?

There is a special rule for a flush in the crib. Normally, if you have four or more cards of the same suit in your hand, including the turn up card, you can score a flush. In the crib, however, a flush only scores if all four cards AND the turn up are the same suit. In other words, only a 5-card flush counts in the crib.

What happens if there is a misdeal?

Jacqueline writes:

The other night, I was playing a game against my roommate. It was his deal and we were both very close to the end hole - he misdealt by dealing out 7 cards instead of 6. I said to take the last card dealt me and to continue playing. He looked at his hand and threw his cards on the deck and said -"Nope - it's a misdeal so I lose my crib". I argued that it wasn't a fair play - he could misdeal on purpose just to shift the game so that he would count/peg first and essentially win. Any ruling on this???

I passed this one over to Ezra, the staff librarian and cribbage rules expert. Ezra says:

Jacqueline, the short answer is that you were right. The ACC tournament rules state that "If either player was dealt the wrong number of cards... there shall be a redeal by the same dealer." However, this rule only applies before the starter card has been turned.

If the starter was already turned when you noticed the misdeal, the situation is more complicated. The ACC says "Pegging and play continue (regardless of time of discovery) until the dealer plays his or her last card. If discovery occurs when the pone plays the excess card(s), pegging is retracted to the point of the playing of the dealer's last card or continues until the dealer plays his or her last card. The dealer's pegging points count. Any points scored by the pone during the pegging are retracted. The pone's hand is dead. The dealer's hand is counted. The crib is counted if it is correct. If the crib has too few cards, a judge mixes all of the pone's cards, and the dealer blindly selects the needed card(s) to complete the crib; the crib is then counted."

In other words, you must play the hand as dealt, until the dealer has played his last card, and then retract all the points you scored as pone, and you do not get to score your hand. I would interpret this as meaning that you cannot go out by pegging from a dead hand.

In non-tournament play I would suggest a simpler rule: if you discover a misdeal, all points scored in this hand are void, pone scores a 2-point penalty, and the dealer redeals. You should certainly not switch dealers under any circumstances.

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