Cribbage flush

A flush in cribbage is 4 or more cards all of the same suit (for example, four diamonds). If you hold 4 cards of the same suit in your hand, you score 4. If the turn-up card is also the same suit, you score 5.

However, in the crib, only a 5-card flush will count (the 4 cards in the crib and the turn-up card must all be the same suit).

See the main cribbage rules page for more information, and also our cribbage scoring chart.

If you only have 3 cards of

If you only have 3 cards of the same suit in your hand, can the turn card count as your fourth since it is your extra card and you only need 4 in you hand?

no. all 4 cards in your hand

no. all 4 cards in your hand must be the same suit

5 card flush which includes The Nob

If you hold a flush which includes The Nob in your hand and the turn card is the same suit, do you count 5 for the flush + 1 for The Nob? Or is it only a 5 count?

Flush Scoring with a Nob

You would score your two points for flipping the jack at the beginning of the round. Then when tallying your hand you would count count it as part of the flush, thus the flush for five.

On a similar note, if you have a Jack in your hand the same as the other three cards and the cut card completes the flush for five, then you also score an additional 1 for having the "right Jack." "A flush for 5 and the right Jack makes 6"

Can you flush in play if 4 or

Can you flush in play if 4 or 5 players lay the same suite in a row?

Flushes

Flushes are NOT counted while pegging (laying cards to 31). They are only counted in hands after pegging.

I've never understood why it

I've never understood why it isn't the reverse.

You get to pick the four cards you keep, while only two are your choice for the crib. Guess it's just one of those things.

what are the odds of getting,

what are the odds of getting, as dealer, 2 flushes in the same deal (1 in hand (4 cards flush) and 1 in kitty (5 cards flush),

just curios

Thanks

Odds

About 1 in 3.7 million - in a two handed game - where you don't attempt take into consideration the odds of your opponent getting any of your flush suit.

In a two handed game your opponent couldn't prevent you from drawing 8 flush cards and the upcard in the same suit - because this hand requires 9 cards in the same suit - leaving the last four to the opponent.
As your opponent draws any of the flush suit cards, odds would be exponentially greater to draw the 9 suited cards to create a double flush.

A three or four person game would be ridiculous - as any more than 4 of the flush suit cards being dealt to other players, blocks this potential hand.

Recalculate Gary

Gary would have you believe that the odds of getting two flushes, one in your hand and the same one in your crib is 20 times more than getting a perfect 29 hand? Come on Gary you know better than that. Your math is way off. In a two-handed game you need 6 (not 8) of the same suit in your hand (happens all the time). You only need two of those same suit from your opponent and then the starter card. This does not "leave" the last 4 to the opponent. Getting a 29 hand is 1:216,500 for two-handed and 1:650,000 for four handed. There are NO higher odds in cribbage. None. The breakdown of each scoring hand can be seen here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cribbage_statistics
The odds of getting a 28 hand in a two-player game are 1 in 15,028.
The odds of getting a perfect 29 hand in a two-player game are 1 in 216,580.
The odds of getting a perfect 29 hand in a three- or four-player game are 1 in 649,740.

Two flushes same deal

I don't know, but if some one can figure that out, figure this one as well:

What are the odds of both player's hands (not the crib) and the cut card being all one suit? AND the cut card ended up being the jack, to boot. So 9 cards, all spades. This just happened to me tonight in a live game with my son. Would have really freaked me out if the last 4 spades in the deck ended up in the crib (there were none).

Happens all the time

Not super common, but does happen all the time.